Education

Etiquette That You Only Learn At School, Stay With You For Long

Etiquette That You Only Learn At School, Stay With You For Long

If the phases of our lives were to be compared with the transmuting seasons, then school life can indubitably be likened with Spring for it brings along all the colours, innocence, versatility, friendship and gives happy memories for keeps. School memories are like the stone engravings because whenever we revisit them they are as dominant and vivid as it comes.

It’s like the potter shaping tender clay into shape, our teachers outline our thoughts, help us strengthen our sense of logic, restore our faith on god, teach us family values and amass into us all the etiquette that the future life calls for.

Since in school we are taught things with textbook examples and we are supposed to memorize them in a given time, those teachings are frozen in our minds forever and violating them is something we can scarcely think of.

The most important thing our schools have taught us was to respect the teachers. We show gratitude to the teachers by standing up on their arrival or greeting them according to the part of the day.

People who studied in convent schools know how they were introduced to spirituality and made familiar with the fact that God is omnipotent. Since the Missionary schools aim to sow religious values in their students, the morning prayers were conducted with extra importance and that habit stayed with the students for long.

Then we were taught to say please, thank you and excuse me sans trepidation and ambiguity. We were taught to mean our words and not fear anyone other than god.

Loving-sharing-caring is the template teaching of all schools. We all had spent that day in school when we were asked to share our food with each other which rekindles brotherhood and antidotes hatred.

Covering our faces while sneezing and coughing to deter the dispersion of germs was another key lesson we all have learnt in our school.

We were admonished by teachers if caught chit-chatting with a friend in a running class. This is annoying for the teacher and not conductive to other students who want to concentrate too. This one etiquette that we learned at school made our lives easier at colleges and professional lives.

We were taught to share each other’s pain and help each other in difficulties. Schools taught us that everyone is not born with the same merit and that we can at least be kind to those who try hard to match steps with us.

We learned to pay the obligatory respect to people like not calling the adults by their names, answering an elderly person’s phone politely, not shouting at our parents at the top of our lungs, always knock the door before entering.

These are the strategic etiquettes we were taught at school which helped build our personality.